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Guest Post - Stephen Hren - Conceding to Consensus with Occupy Durham

by: EJ on 11/04/2011
Posted in: Guest Posts

Stephen Hren, author of the recently released Tales from the Sustainable Underground: A Wild Journey with People Who Care More about the Planet than the Law, posted this article about his experiences with Occupy Durham, NC, on his Huffingpost blog, November 3, 2011 which is reprinted here with permission.

 

 

 

 

I've felt a little like a grizzled old …

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Debt Tantrum on a Sinking Ship - Guest Post, Richard Heinberg

by: EJ on 08/05/2011
Posted in: Guest Posts

Richard Heinberg is Senior Fellow-in-Residence at Post Carbon Institute and the author of 10 books, including The End of Growth: Adapting to Our New Economic Reality.
In this guest post, taken from the Post Carbon Institute blog July 26th, he explains the recent debt ceiling crisis  in a broader context, one of drastically altered economic …

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Guest Post: Charles Durrett - Do Your Homework Before Sitting Down to the Table

by: Sara on 06/23/2011
Posted in: Guest Posts

This just in from Charles Durrett author of Creating Cohousing, Building Sustainable Communities :

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Guest Post - Jenn Savedge - My Plastic Free February

by: EJ on 02/01/2011
Posted in: Guest Posts

Each week I receive Green Parent Daily Tips from Jenn Savedge. Jenn is a full-time mom, environmentalist and author who researches and writes about the two topics that are closest to her heart: children and the environment. Her book, The Green Teen: The Eco-Friendly Teen's Guide to Saving the Planet, was published by New Society Publishers in …

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Guest Post - John Restakis - Humanizing the Economy

by: EJ on 10/27/2010
Posted in: Guest Posts

Humanizing the Economy by John Restakis has just been released and was launched to celebrate Co-op Week on October 21st. In this guest post, author John Restakis explains his motivation for writing the book and his hopes for the future.

In the fall of 2008, I was fortunate enough to be able to take a year long sabbatical to research and write about the role of the co-op model in today’s global era. When I left Vancouver for my outpost on the quiet mountain slopes of eastern Tuscany, things were just beginning to look bad on Wall Street. By mid November, the financial systems of the world’s leading economies were on the verge of collapse. I followed the events on a tiny television from the kitchen of a small stone farmhouse surrounded by thick woods and deep snow but still able to receive the satellite signals of the BBC and Al Jazeera. It was a perfect instance of the perks and perils of our global era. Deeply affected by what I was witnessing, as were millions of others, I decided to frame the narrative of the book I was writing within the crisis of capitalism and the utter lack of any consequential discussion of an alternative. Two years on, the meltdown seems to have been stemmed. But the deeper crisis of a system in dysfunction continues to unfold. Meanwhile, opposition to the status quo has become a permanent and growing feature of any international economic gathering. Most recently, at the June meetings of the G20 and G8 in Toronto, the security measures surpassed $1 billion in costs and turned the city’s core into an armed camp.

In fact, the rising crescendo of protests that commenced at the Battle of Seattle a decade ago are only the most recent outcries against a model of economic and social organization that has drawn determined opposition and resistance for the last two hundred years. But the tangible effects of this global economic order, the marks that it scribes on the lives and livelihoods of billions of people the world over, are felt not in the realm of ideology, trade policy or politics. The effects are visible in the wages people earn if they are lucky enough to have a job, in the prices they get for their coffee beans, in the cleanliness of their drinking water, in the quality of their shelter and whether or not their children will go to school. These are the battles for survival and the prospect of life with dignity that billions of people the world over have to wage day in and day out. Today, with a global economic crisis destroying the livelihoods and pulling the foundations from under millions in developed and poor economies alike, the pitfalls of the new economic order are plain for all to see.

I wrote Humanizing the Economy to talk about an alternative. At its heart, it is a story about how a revolution in human society that began with the rise of democracy in politics continues to unfold as the democratic idea struggles to find its place in the world of economics. If economic democracy is the hidden face of this ongoing revolution, then the history of the co-operative idea is its most durable expression.

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